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Doggy's Blog

Cricket's The Concussion Rule

Posted on 20 August, 2019 at 0:45

The “Concussion Rule” denied England a series levelling win at Lords last night.

 

In the course of any sporting event, injuries happen. Jim Anderson if you remember suffered a recurrence of a calf strain in the first innings of the Edgbaston Test; having completed just 4 overs he was unable to contribute for the remainder of the match. England played on with a substitute fielder but were a bowler down for the most of the Test Match.

 

On the other hand at Lords, Australia were allowed to replace Smith who during a enthralling battle with England’s fast man Jofra Archer misplayed a rising ball and was felled from a severe blow that hit Steve behind the left ear. Steve was forced to retired hurt even though he was wearing all the injury prevention equipment he could find (helmet, leg guards thigh pad gloves etc).

 

He then returns to crease moments later, but is unable to take the field for the second innings.

 

Now it is fair for England to play a bowler short, but it is for Australia to play a batsmen short because they were allowed to replace Smith with another top order replacement rather than suffer the inconvenience of playing on with one short; I find this rule absurd.

 

No athlete wants to suffer injury or loss of form particularly in a team sport environment. In almost all team sport scenarios; sitting on the sidelines are reserve players (replacements) ready to take the field to reduce workload or replace non contributors.

 

So why are we allowed to replace an injured batsman but an injured bowler?

 

In all circumstances a bowlers is just as important to a teams chances of victory as any batsmen.

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